hidden
hidden

Two Valley Families Plan Journey of Hope

Two central San Joaquin Valley families are set to travel more than 6,000 miles to China for an experimental stem-cell treatment for their children. Aleesha and Michael Klomp of Hanford said they're willing to take a chance so their son Gryphon Klomp, 2, might walk and grasp a spoon some day soon. Fresno mother Jennifer Schmidt has the same faith about the benefits of umbilical cord stem-cell therapy for 2-year-old daughter Brooke Schmidt-Jordan. Both toddlers have cerebral palsy. Stem cell research in the United States has been delayed due to concerns about the use of stem cells taken from embryos. However the process to be used by these two families will involve the use of stem cells from donated umbilical cord blood. This form of stem cell therapy is not as available in the United State as it is overseas. "Why would I wait five years to help him?" asked Michael Klomp, a construction worker.

Two central San Joaquin Valley families are set to travel more than 6,000 miles to China for an experimental stem-cell treatment for their children. Aleesha and Michael Klomp of Hanford said they're willing to take a chance so their son Gryphon Klomp, 2, might walk and grasp a spoon some day soon. Fresno mother Jennifer Schmidt has the same faith about the benefits of umbilical cord stem-cell therapy for 2-year-old daughter Brooke Schmidt-Jordan. Both toddlers have cerebral palsy. Stem cell research in the United States has been delayed due to concerns about the use of stem cells taken from embryos. However the process to be used by these two families will involve the use of stem cells from donated umbilical cord blood. This form of stem cell therapy is not as available in the United State as it is overseas. "Why would I wait five years to help him?" asked Michael Klomp, a construction worker.

View Full Story